Math Department

Justin Gentry

Teacher

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Dean Hollis

Teacher

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Courtney Parris

Teacher

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Stephanie Walker

Teacher

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Description: 

In high school (grades 9-12) the standards are organized by conceptual categories, the overarching ideas that describe strands of content in high school, domains/clusters, which are groups of standards that describe coherent aspects of the content category, and standards, which define what students should know and be able to do at each grade level. These standards include skills and knowledge – what students need to know and be able to do, as well as mathematical practices – habits of mind that students should develop to foster mathematical understanding and expertise.

The high school standards emphasize mathematical modeling—the use of mathematics and statistics to analyze empirical situations, understand them more fully, and make better decisions. For example, the standards state: “Modeling links classroom mathematics and statistics to everyday life, work, and decision-making. Modeling is the process of choosing and using appropriate mathematics and statistics to analyze empirical situations, to understand them better, and to improve decisions. Quantities and their relationships in physical, economic, public policy, social, and everyday situations can be modeled using mathematical and statistical methods. When making mathematical models, technology is valuable for varying assumptions, exploring consequences, and comparing predictions with data.”

Courses Offered: